Teaching/Educational Activities



2018


Mediterranean School of Complex Networks

 

1-8 September 2018

International Summer School, by Manlio De Domenico
English [Web]

This course is thought as a first introduction to the framework of multilayer networks, i.e. graphs whose nodes are connected by links of different nature. The course will start with a detailed introduction of the multilayer framework, both from the theoretical and the applicative points of view, using the tensorial approach. In particular, it will be shown how to transfer all key concepts of graph theory into the multilayer networks, approaching some also some very recent results in the field. A number of applications to several scientific and socioeconomic scenarios will conclude the theoretical course. Finally, a hands-on tutorial will allow the student to reach a working knowledge of all the material.

Multilayer Networks

 

21-25 May 2018

Course for the ICT Doctoral School, by Manlio De Domenico
English [Web]

This course is thought as a first introduction to the framework of multilayer networks, i.e. graphs whose nodes are connected by links of different nature. The course will start with a detailed introduction of the multilayer framework, both from the theoretical and the applicative points of view, using the tensorial approach. In particular, it will be shown how to transfer all key concepts of graph theory into the multilayer networks, approaching some also some very recent results in the field. A number of applications to several scientific and socioeconomic scenarios will conclude the theoretical course. Finally, a hands-on tutorial will allow the student to reach a working knowledge of all the material.

Program:

Network Science

 

16-20 Apr 2018

Course for the ICT Doctoral School, by Alex Arenas (invited)
English [More Info]

Network science has emerged as a branch of study focussing interest on the connectivity interactions between elements of a system. The most central object of study in network science are the so-called complex networks.
Complex weblike structures describe a wide variety of systems of high technological and intellectual importance. For example, the cell is best described as a complex network of chemicals connected by chemical reactions; the Internet is a complex network of routers and computers linked by various physical or wireless links; fads and ideas spread on the social network, whose nodes are human beings and whose edges represent various social relationships; the World Wide Web is an enormous virtual network of Web pages connected by hyperlinks. These systems represent just a few of the many examples that have recently prompted the scientific community to investigate the relationship between the topology of complex networks and the dynamics that take place on them.
A complex network is just a graph with several non-trivial topological properties, not present in simple models of networks. Some of them are: scale-free degree distributions, high clustering coefficients (i.e. more triangles than expected in a random network), assortativity (correlations between connected nodes’ degrees), and community structure. On the contrary, simple graphs such as random networks or grids show a homogeneous structure in which all nodes are almost indistinguishable, unlike what is observed in real networks.
In this course we will review the state-of-the-art in network science and put focus on the applications, and open problems faced so far.

Program: